Mysterious Dunes On  Io May Be Formed By Lava

Jupiter's Volcanic Moon

A New study shows. 

Jupiter's super-volcanic moon boasts grand, meandering dunes created not by wind but by lava flows beneath the moon's surface

Io is Jupiter's third-largest

 moon and the innermost of the four large Galilean satellites. It has an icy, yet rolling surface, which has long perplexed scientists.

The 14-year mission,

which explored the Jupiter system from 1995 to 2003, provided images necessary to create the first detailed maps of Jupiter's moons

The 14-year mission,

which explored the Jupiter system from 1995 to 2003, provided images necessary to create the first detailed maps of Jupiter's moons

By nature, dunes are defined as

hills or ridges of sand piled up by the wind. However, the moon's low-density atmosphere means Io's winds are weak, suggesting its dunes  formed by other means.

By nature, dunes are defined as

hills or ridges of sand piled up by the wind. However, the moon's low-density atmosphere means Io's winds are weak, suggesting its dunes  formed by other means.

Io is the most volcanically

 active world in the solar system, sporting hundreds of volcanoes, some of which spew sulfurous plumes hundreds of miles or kilometers high.

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